Boundary Commission

1891 058 Crown
Certification: 058
Ahupua`a: Humuula (Part 1)
District: Hilo
Island: Hawaii
Ownership: Crown
Misc:
Year: 1891
Statistics: 84336 characters 14438 words
Humuula Ahupuaa, District of Hilo, Island of Hawaii, Boundary Commission, Hawaii, Volume A; pps. 238-240

Honolulu, July 7, 1873
R.A. Lyman, Esquire, Hilo
Dear Sir
Mr. F.H. Harris is authorized by the commissioners of Crown lands to make application to you as commissioner of Boundaries to have the boundaries of all Crown lands on the Island of Hawaii defined. He has a list of the lands with him.

I have also authorized Mr. F.H. Harris to make application to you for the settlement of boundaries of all lands belonging to Estate of His late Majesty and Her Excellency, R. Keelikolani.

I expect to be in Kona by the trip of the "Kilauea" which leaves here on the 28th instant. Can't you make it convenient to come round as the steamer goes to Hilo on that trip.

I wish also to apply for the settlement of the boundaries of Honohina.
I remain, Yours respectfully
Jno. O. Dominis

Honorable R.A. Lyman, Boundary Commissioner for Island of Hawaii, Hawaiian Islands
The undersigned would herewith make application for the settlement of the boundaries of the following named Ahupuaa or lands belonging to the Crown, viz.;

Waiakea in the District of Hilo bounded by Keaau, Olaa, Kapapala, Humuula, Piihonua

Piihonua in the District of Hilo, bounded by Punahoa, Waiakea, Humuula and Pueo, Paukaa & Alae and other lands names not known

Ponahawai in the District of Hilo bounded by Punahoa, Kukuau & other small lands.
Hakalauike in the District of Hilo, adjoining lands unknown [page 239]
Humuula in the District of Hilo bounded by Kapapala, various lands in Kona and Kohala and Hamakua, and Hakalau, Makahanaloa, Papaikou, Paukaa, Piihonua and Waiaka in the District of Hilo

Lalakea in the District of Hamakua, adjoining lands unknown
Kalopa in the District of Hamakua, adjoining lands unknown
Honokaia in the District of Hamakua, adjoining lands unknown
Kaohia in the District of Hamakua, adjoining lands unknown
Waimanu in the District of Hamakua, adjoining lands unknown
Pohakumauluulu, Ili of Waipio in the District of Hamakua, adjoining lands unknown
Muliwai, Ili of Waipio in the District of Hamakua

Pololu in the District of Kohala adjoining lands unknown
Aamakao in the District of Kohala adjoining lands unknown
Iole in the District of Kohala adjoining lands unknown
Kaaukuku in the District of Kohala adjoining lands unknown
Waimea in the District of Kohala adjoining lands unknown
Puukapu in the District of Kohala adjoining lands unknown
Kawaihae in the District of Kohala adjoining lands unknown
Puuwaawaa In the District of Kona bounded by Puuanahulu, Government, Kaupulehu Estate Kamehameha V.

Haleohia in the District of Kona bounded by Government lands & Kaupulehu, Estate Kamehameha V.

Honomalino in the District of Kona bounded by Omokaa & Okoi, Government & by Kahuku, G.W. C. Jones & Co.
Puaa in the District of Kona adjoining lands unknown
Onouli in the District of Kona adjoining lands unknown [page 240]
Manoloa, District of Hilo
Hiaananaloli II in the District of Kona bounded by Hiaananaloli, Government & Hiaanaloli, R. Keliikolani.

Waiohinu in the District of Kau, bounded by Keau, Government, Kahilipalinui and Kahuku, G.W.C. Jones & Co.

Kapapala in the District of Kau bounded by Kahuku, G.W.C. Jones, Keauhou, Estate Kamehameha V, Waiakea, Hilo & other lands unknown

Olaa in the District of Puna, bounded by Keaau, Wm. C. Lunalilo, His Majesty, Waiakea & Kapapala

Apua in the District of Puna. Bounded by various lands in Puna
Waiakolea, ili of Kalapana, District of Puna adjoining lands unknown
Kaimu in the District of Puna adjoining lands unknown
Gehena [?Kehena] in the District of Puna adjoining lands unknown

Your Honor will therefore please appoint a day for the hearing the evidence in the foregoing named lands and having decided upon the same to grant a certificate to that effect to the undersigned
(Signed) Jno. O. Dominis, Crown Land Agent,
by F.H. Harris, attorney at law,

Hilo Hawaii, August 16th A.D. 1873


Humuula Ahupuaa, District of Hilo, Island of Hawaii, Boundary Commission, Hawaii, Volume B; pps 28-59

The Ahupuaa of Humuula, District of Hilo, Island of Hawaii, 3d Judicial Circuit

On this, the 3d day of November A.D. 1873 by adjournment from the 30th October, the Commission of Boundaries for the Island of Hawaii, 3d Judicial Circuit met at the Court House in Hilo, on the application of J.O. Dominis, Agent of Crown Lands for the settlement of the boundaries of Humuula, situated in the District of Hilo, Island of Hawaii.

Notice personally served on owners or Agents of adjoining lands, as far as known. Also served by publication in the Hawaiian Gazette of [left blank] and Kuokoa of [left blank].

Present, E.G. Hitchcock for applicant, for Mrs. L.K. Dominis, Her Excellency, R. Keelikolani, the Estate of Kamehameha V, C.R. Bishop and self, D. Kamai for Hawaiian Government Lands in Hilo, and D. Alapai.

For Petition see Folio 238, Book A.

Testimony

J.A. Simmons, kane, sworn, I have lived on Hawaii for forty two years and in Hilo, District about half of that time. I shot wild cattle on Humuula for eight years. This was soon after I came into the Country, but I have been there since. I used to live with Ned Gurney at Lahohino, a place above the woods on Humuula. He had lived there a great many years, and was kamaaina of the place. He and others pointed out to me the boundaries between Humuula and the lands of Maulua, Hakalau, Makahanaloa and Piihonua.

Makaulaula, kane and Opukeike, kane, old bird catchers of Piihonua, also pointed out the boundaries to me, when I lived at Pahukea, saw mills on Piihonua.

Humuula is bounded on the east side by Kahoahuna, the boundary is at the bottom of Kaoalii gulch, where water sometimes runs; thence up the gulch, through the woods. Kahoahuna only extends a short distance and I do not know the names of the lands above Kahoahuna (Mrs. Halelea's).
[page 29]
The boundary as pointed out to me above the woods runs towards Hilo. The mamani &c being on Humuula until you come to Maulua. I do not know what lands bound it before you come to the land of Maulua. The boundary between Humuula and Maulua (as pointed out to me) is at the edge of the woods makai of the mamani; the boundary of Maulua on the Hamakua side is at a gulch called Kaiaike; Thence along the edge of the woods crossing two or three awaawa to an awaawa at the junction of Maulua and Piha. I can go and point this place out, but I do not remember the name. Thence along the edge of the woods across the head of Piha to Naohe gulch, at the junction of Hakalau, with Humuula and Piha (This is what I have always been told); thence along the head of Hakalau to Palanolelo gulch, the boundary runs to a pile of stones, on the Hilo side of the gulch, and about two hundred yards above the edge of the woods; thence along the head of Makahanaloa to Nukupahu gulch, the boundary running on the makai side of the mamani; thence (I was gold) the boundary runs along the mauka edge of the woods along the land of Piihonua (There may be other lands between Makahanaloa and Piihona for I do not know how far Piihonua bounds Humuula, but I do know that the boundary of Humuula runs along the mauka edge of the woods[)]. I do not know as Waiakea bounds it. I have heard that the land reaches to Kapapala, but I do not know it to where [?overwritten word]. Have heard it reaches to Pohakuhanalei, a big stone near the top of Mauna Loa, on the slope toward Mauna Kea.

Humuula is cut off on the Kona side by Kaohe of Hamakua; heave never heard that it joins Kaalaala of Kau. Kaohe bounds it on Mauna Kea and I do not know the boundaries of Mauna Loa.

On Mauna Kea Humuula (was pointed out to me) as extending up the mountain as far as the mamani grows. I do not know the names of the points on this boundary but I could point them out if I went there. It comes over towards Hamakua to Iolehaehae; thence to Kaula gulch, where it enters the mauka edge of the forest. I do not know the boundaries through the [page 30] woods. The land of Kaala bounds Humuula just above the woods. The boundary at the Government road makai is at a small gulch on the Hamakua side of Kaualii gulch. I do not know the names of the gulch or lands that bounds it there.
Cross-examined
The boundary (as pointed out to me) after it runs through the woods, did not run makai into the woods again, but took the mamani above the woods. The lands makai run through the woods to mamani, there may be a tree or two of mamani in woods. A great deal of the forest has been killed out by the cattle barking the trees and destroying the underbrush. Therefore the woods do not extend so far mauka s they did twenty years ago.

Know the place called Puuoo, a big hill on the plains of Humuula is now called by that name, but the original Puuoo is a hill covered with ohia, and was told it was on the land of Waiakea. It is makai of the hill on Humuula, and I am certain it is not on that land. I now live at Laupahoehoe.

Nainoa, kane, sworn, I am a kamaaina of Hamakua, at the time of Aipala, now a part of the boundaries of Humuula, as they were pointed out to me by people who are now dead.

Li Kauwila (his father) and Pali, who were kamaainas of Humuula showed me the boundaries, and told me not to go to certain places.

The boundary at shore is at Kawalii gulch and is bounded by Kahoahuna, thence mauka along the gulch to Waipunalei, do not know where Kahoahuna ends. Thence along Waipunalei to Kihalei, puu mamake, a point in the woods on Kawalii gulch; thence along Maulua to a place called Kaiaike, a kauhale on Humuula, at the mauka edge of the woods. The mamani is on Humuula and the woods are on Maulua.

At Kihalei the boundary leaves the Kawalii gulch and runs to the Hilo side of it, along the land of Maulua, leaving [page 31] all the gulch on Humuula. From Kaiaike the boundary runs towards Hilo to Heenui, a place where we used to catch birds, and the junction of Piha with Maulua and Humuula; thence along Piha to (Naohe) Pohohona, an awaawa at the edge of the woods, makai of the kauhale of Naohe; Thence along the mauka edge of the woods to Kaloaloa, the junction of Hakalau with Humuula (The old people did not know what lands were between Piha and Hakalau.[)] Kaloaloa is a kauhale and a pond of water; thence along Hakalau, makai of the mamani, to Palanolelo, a kauhale, above the woods on Humuula, thence (I have head [heard]) Papaikou joins Humuula and Hakalau; thence crossing the head of Papaikou to the kahawai Kapuakala, which I have heard is a branch of the Wailuku gulch; thence the boundary runs to Waipahoehoe gulch, above the woods, the mamani being on Humuula; thence to Laumaia along Piihonua; thence to Aama; thence to Waikee gulch; thence to Puuoo, a hill above the woods, the boundary on the makai side; there are small trees on the hill and there is a pond of water called Kelewa this side of it. Above the woods, and towards Mauna Loa of Puuoo it belongs to Humuula. Humuula and Piihonua people used to go after water there. This is as far as I know the boundaries and as far as I went with the kamaaina; they told me that Humuula was bounded by Kapapala of Kau, Keauhou of Kona and Kaohe of Hamakua. I have never heard that Kaalaala of Kau or Waiakea of Hilo joined Humuula. The old trail from Humuula towards Piihonua used to run along the mauka edge of the woods near the boundary; not in the woods. The Humuula and Piihonua people used to go after water at Kelewa.

Humuula is bounded makai by the sea to Keahuonaai, bounded by the land of Kaohaoha on the Hamakua side, the boundary running in the center of Poololo gulch. I do not know the boundaries through to the outside of the woods, know it is bounded by Kaala at Lahohino. The boundary above the woods is at Kaula gulch, said gulch runs makai but there are several lands between it [page 32] and Humuula, makai of the woods.

Lahohino is on Humuula near Kala gulch; thence mauka to Ahapopuaa (an ahupuaa) along Kaala, at this point Kaohe joins Humuula and cuts Kaala off. This is as as [sic] far as I know the boundaries.
Cross-examined
Don't know what lands bound Humuula in woods on Hamakua side.
I went after birds on Humuula for seven years after Kaua o Kekuaokalani[?] and have often been there since. The line of the woods is in the same place now as in olden times. I have always heard that Maulua and other lands run through the woods to the makai side of the mamani. When I went after birds on Humuula, Li told me not to catch the birds in Koa and mamani, as they belonged to the makai lands, and would be taken away by the people of those lands if I caught them.

J. Parker, kane, sworn, I have lived on Hawaii nearly fifty years, used to live on the mountain, and shoot bullock for Kamehameha III, at the time that the natives were gathering sandalwood. I have often been on Humuula after bullock and have heard the natives talking about the boundaries; they said that where ever the mamani grew, above the woods was Humuula, and the land below the mamani belonged to the makai lands. I head this from men who were old and gray headed then. In those days the mamani did not reach near to the koa there used to be plains between and I always understood that the tall forests belonged to the makai lands and the pili and mamani to Humuula. Hemahema's father (now dead) and Paakai, who was killed in a pit on the mountain were two of the ones that told me the above. I have always heard that Humuula commences at shore and runs up mauka, through the woods, but I never heard that it runs back into the woods again. Have been up Maulua road and always understood that Maulua did not run through [illegible] the woods but I do not know whether Piiha on Humuula cut if off.
Cross-examined.

[page 33]
Kahue, kane, sworn, I was born at Humuula, am seventy-three years of age, and a kamaaina of the land and know its boundaries. Kalaimaka, Mohaiku, Eekamoku (all dead) were kamaaina of Humuula and pointed out the boundaries to me. Kahoahuna bounds Humuula on the east side, the boundary beginning at the sea shore in Kaualii gulch; thence mauka along the center of the gulch to Mauiana gulch at the mauka corner of Kahoahuna (said gulch is a branch of the Kaualii and enters it at this place); thence along the lands of Auliilii 2d and Auliilii 1st across to Waiapae gulch (another branch of the Kawalii) the boundary running towards Hilo.

Kahoahuna runs into the woods, but where the oo are is Humuula. From Waiapae, the boundary runs in the woods to Waipahoehoe gulch, where Waipunalei joins Humuula. Waiapae is a large pool of water in the gulch. Waipahoehoe gulch runs clear through the woods and Waipunalei bounds Humuula to Pihalelei about three miles below the mauka edge of the woods. Thence towards Hilo to the land of Laupahoehoe, at Puukole, a kuahu manu and kauhale, this place is away in the woods, as far makai as Pihahelei; it is on Laupahoehoe; thence to Puukoa, a hill covered with koa, on Kaiwilaihilaihi and Kapehu and at the junction of Kaiwilaihilaihi and Humuula; the boundary here runs mauka and I think this point is a mile or more below the mauka edge of the woods. Thence along Kapehu to Pupuulehu, a kauhale on Maulua, a mile or more from the edge of the woods; thence along Maulua towards Hilo, to Kawelu; said place is near Heenui, and there is a mamani grove a short distance off. This place Kawelu, is about a mile makai of the mauka edge of the forest (Kaiaiki is mauka of Puulehu); thence along the land of Piha. Kaluaalu mauka of the woods on Humuula and Kumukau are on Piha; directly makai, and about a mile below the edge of the forest; thence along the land of Piha to Kaumuhapu, this place is directly makai of Naohe.
[page 34]
This place is a kualapa, and is where the people of Naohe used to go after hapu. Thence Hakalau joins Humuula at Naohe gulch at the mauka end of Umauma gulch. Kaumuhapu is above this gulch. Thence along Hakalau to Kupuna, a water place directly makai of Hapuwai, outside of the woods; Kupuna is about a mile makai of the mauka edge of the woods; thence to Makewai, a place where there is no water.

Nawaiahu is a kauhale outside of the woods near Hakalau gulch. From Makewai the boundary runs through the woods to Kapahee, he mauwai koloa. Kaloaloa is a kualapa above the woods; Kapahee is about a mile below the edge of the woods; thence along Hakalalu to a large water place called Kapohopaele, makai of Palauolelo, which is above the woods; thence along Makahanaloaa to Waikaloa, a large pond of water on Papaikou, the point above this place is Kaaimana, a kauhale on Humuula. Waikaloa is about a mile makai of the mauka edge of the forest; thence to Kumukawau, a kauhale, on Papaikou, it is makai of Kapuakala; a kauhale on Humuula and near the boundary of Puakaa. Thence to Kalaopapainui a kauhale on kualapa on Paukaa land and where Piihonua joins Humuula. There is no gulch here. The Kapuakala is on the Hamakua side of this place and the point of koa and ohia woods running out onto the plains just mauka of this place is Lai. (I went there a short time since with you, E.G. Hitchock, and Hitchcock and we placed a marked rock at this point called Lai).

Thence makai along the land of Piihonua to Paakainui, a kauhale on Piihonua. above in the woods, and makai of Waipahoehoe, a cave in Wailuku gulch of woods (it is a mile makai of the edge of the forest); thence to Kumunaio, makai of Lumaia, the cave called Kanuha is at Laumaia, the boundary runs parallel with the mauka edge of the woods. Kumunaio is where the road runs out of the gulch that runs from the mauka edge of the forest; thence to Ohiakanio, this place is directly makai of the kahawai, and cave of Aama; thence to Nahuina, the junction of the branches of the Wailuku. The boundary runs makai to this gulch. I think this place is a mile or more from the mauka edge of the forest - about the same [page 35] distance as the other places I have mentioned. Puuoo is a hill mauka of Nahuina above the woods; thence to Elekalua, a kauhale in the woods, makai of Kahiliku, a lae laau outside of the woods; thence to Mawai, a crack in the woods that runs from makai. I have heard that Waiakea joins Humuula here, but I do not know which side of the lava flow of 1854 or 1855 the lands join. Thence the boundary of Humuula runs to Kawauwauwai, a kauhale; the boundary running to this point in scattering bush, the forest ends at Elekalua. I have never seen the boundaries beyond Kawauwauwai. From thence (I have heard) it runs to Puuoo, a hill covered with trees; mauka of Hoaa; thence to Keanaokauakii, a cave above the woods; thence to Puumanu, a hill on the aa way above the woods (I have been there); thence to Pohakuloa, an ahu of stones, now called Keahu o Kuakini, as Kuakini built a new ahu there. Kapapala is said to cut Humuula off to Pohakuhanalei. Boundary runs near Puuonioni, on Humuula, the boundary is a little beyond Wekahuna, a hill on Humuula. Waiakea ends at Pohakuloa, and from there Humuula is bounded by Kapapala to Pohakuhanalei (I do not know whether Kapapala extends to Pohakuhanalei); From Pohakuhanalei to Koaohe it is bounded by Kaalaala of Kau. I have been to Koaohe after sandalwood. It is a point on the road running over Mauna Loa. Pohakuhanalei is a large rock high up on the side of Mauna Loa toward Kalaieha.

Koaohe is on Mauna Loa, a koa; there Kaohe joins to Puualala, a cave. Thence to Puualalula, a red hill on the side of Mauna Loa near its base. Thence along the land of Kaohe to Omaokoili, two hills, the boundary running between them. Thence to Kauwaiwa, a hill on Humuula, near boundary, near the base of Mauna Kea; Thence to kahawai Koikapue, a gulch where mele were sung; thence up the mountain to Waiau (half of the water in the gulch belonging to Kuohe and half to Humuula; thence to Puuokukahauula, the highest peak of Mauna Kea, said hill in on Humuula and the boundary runs to the foot of said hill on the side toward Waimea; thence to a large ahu called Makanaka, said ahu is [page 36] on Humuula and is higher than a man; the boundary runs very near it. Thence to Kamakahalau, a hill on Humuula, from the top of which you can see Waiakea; thence to Puukaliali, a hill on Humuula, the boundary at the base; thence makai to Iolehaehae, a hill on Humuula, boundary at the base. Thence down to Ahuapoopuaa, a ku ahu and hill on Humuula, the boundary at the base; thence down to Kaiwiholiholi, an ahua pohaku there; thence to Ahuamoa, along the land of Kaohe. Kaala was surveyed by Lyons and cuts into Humuula, and takes in Iolehaehae, Ahupup ....

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.... I was with Henry Lyman most of the time while he was surveying the land of Hakalau; was with him when he surveyed the upper part of it. I think it was in 1853 or 1854. I do not remember names of kamaaina. He had kamaaina at that time. If I remember right old Waiki was the kamaaina on part of Humuula. I accompanied my brother as he was teaching me surveying. Neither line was cut through the woods. My brother had already surveyed Makahanaloa bounding Humuula on one side. He cut through the woods on that survey. The lands Makahanaloa and Hakalau abound each other most of the way; through the woods; do not join at lower edge. This is the Puna side. The Hamakua side was along the Kamaee gulch. Do not know as it was measured all the way. It was measured below the woods. I was not with him all the time. The line on the Puna side of Hakalau was measured from shore to woods and the [page 58] distance from this line to a prominent hill in woods on Makahanaloa was measured by triangulation. The kamaaina said there was a certain point in the woods where Hakalau joined Makahanaloa, that he had got on a previous survey of Makahanaloa. Being no natural boundary on that side he made a straight line to that point from the lower edge of the woods. From the other side adjoining Humuula we went to the upper side of the woods. Kapou was the man who had charge of Hakalau at that time. He went with us and took other men who he said were kamaaina, as he was not well acquainted himself. Kapou tells me these kamaaina were Kupouli and Manu. Waiki went with us from Humuula. We went through the woods. James Castle, and two men to carry the chain, went along with my brother and myself. We went to a pile of stones on a little hillock above the woods. I should say it was on the pili grass about a quarter of a mile from the thick forest, among scattering trees, mamani, koa and some ohia. I was told that pile of stones was at the western corner of Makahanaloa, mauka end, as it had been surveyed by my brother. The kamaaina said that was where Hakalau joined Makahanaloa and Humuula. There was o dispute about it among the kamaaina at that time. We measured from that pile of stones, along the land of Humuula, towards Hamakua as the kamaaina pointed out, keeping just about as far from the thick forest as when we started from Makahanaloa, until we came to a gulch, which the kamaaina said was the Kamaee gulch. I do not remember the name they gave it; they said it was the gulch that went clear to the sea and that it was the boundary below between Kamaee and Hakalau. I have with me notes made by brother. It is not a very wide gulch, but it is quite deep. If I remember right, we built a pile of stones on the Puna side of it. The line, where we measured, was given as the mauka boundary of Hakalau, and nothing was said about the boundary being elsewhere. The kamaaina took us [page 59] to the corner of Makahanaloa and said that was the point where the lands joined.

My brother took Castle along as he wished to be certain that he found the same pile of stones as he built when surveying Makahanaloa.

At that time Castle was shooting on the mountain, a great deal of the time, and said he had seen the pile of stones and could point it out.

Notes read. Hakalau uka commenced at Puakala, four courses straightened into one.
North 3° West 117.10 chains to stream. Waiahiu.

I can swear that is the original notes of survey as made by my brother.

The survey was made for Halalea.

Papaikou was surveyed by Henry and David surveyed Paukaa. Papaikou corners with Makahanaloa; the survey of Paukaa overlaps Papaikou and Makahanaloa.
Cross-examined.

Case continued until further notice to all interested parties.
R.A. Lyman, Commissioner of Boundaries, 3d Judicial Circuit

Continued on Folio 174


Humuula Ahupuaa, District of Hilo, Island of Hawaii, Boundary Commission, Volume B; pps 174-177

The Ahupuaa of Humuula, District of Hilo, Island of Hawaii, 3d Judicial Circuit

Continued from Folio 59

Notes from the journal of the Honorable Commissioner of Boundaries taken while visiting the upper boundaries of Humuula.

November 28th, 1873
Left J. Parkers. Mana, Hamakua, Island of Hawaii in company with L. McCully, H.B. Montgomery, and E.R. Folson, and proceeded to Kalopa, Hamauka. There met D.H. Hitchcock and E.G. Hitchcock. Found that Peleiholani had gone to Hilo and that James castle was too sick to come.

November 29th 1873
Left Kalopa and proceeded to Kaala. There went through the forest onto the foot of the mountain and went along the road to Laumaia, the road runs a short distance above the woods. Above the woods, we passed a good many of the points mentioned by Kahue, Naaikauna, Waiki and others in their testimony and camped after dark at a place called Hapuwai.

Naaikauna and Kahue joined the party at Kaala. L. McCully and H.B. Montgomery left us at the upper edge of the woods. Heard of James Castle's death when half way through the woods.

November 30th 1873
Started at day light and went along the upper edge of the forest passing Nawaiheu gulch to Hahaloa, there left the trail to Laumaia and went into the woods for some distance on the kualapa; boundary between Hakalau and Makahanaloa to opposite Puuwai, a hill on Hakalau; there we left the boundary and went onto Makahanaloa, crossing the Aama gulch, and camped on Makahanaloa some distance makai of Puuwai.

Kahue says Puuwai is a long distance [page 175] makai of the point he claims as the boundary between Humuula, Hakalau and Makahanaloa.

December 1st, 1873
Left camp and walked up to where we struck the ridge that runs into wood from makai of Kaloloa. We were onto the ridge a good way mauka of Puuwai. Left D.W. Hitchcock at camp.

After a good deal of persuasion on Kahue, he pointed out a hollow on the top of the ridge as Pohopaele. At this point the kualapa is quite high and slopes off rapidly toward the shore. It is impossible for this point to be seen from Kaloloa as it is be lower than the edge of the woods. It took us twenty minutes to walk from this point to what is now the upper ridge of the forest. The boundary between Humuula and Makahanaloa, as pointed out by Kahue, is a hollow commencing on the ridge between these two lands; this ridge is the one on which the road from the beach through Makahanaloa lies; thence the hollow runs down the kualapa the same as the ridge and on the west side of Aama gulch.

Puuwai is on the next ridge to ea westward [diagram of Y lying on its side with word ridge along foot and no (illegible word) in it]. The upper portion of the forest is full of dry trees, laying all over the ground. We then proceeded to Palanohelo gulch. Kahue pointed out to us where the woods used to run; it was close to Laumaia road. We then went to Kapuakalawaiole. Kapuakalawai is near Lai, said to be the Nukupahu gulch. Then went to a point of woods called Lai, a long sharp point of woods extending to some distance above the woods. Then went on across Waipahoehoe and Laumaia gulches and the Aama branch of the Wailuku. From thence we went to Mr. Kirchoff's house, where L. McCully rejoined the party. We then proceeded to Kalaieha. Kahue states that the Nahuina of Wailuku is not where the Laumaia and Waipahoehoe branches unite, but that it is about the same distance makai of the mauka edge of the woods ass Pohopaele, that the gulches Aama, Waikee and Kalapaohelo unite at Keanalepo, and that Keanalepo is not the makai junction of Laumaia. He states that [page 176] Keanalepo is a place that he dug.

Arrived at Kalaieha a little before dark.

December 2d, 1873, Kalaieha
On asking Kahue to point out Pohakuhanalei he pointed out a hill a good ways down the slope of Mauna Loa below what we had always understood to be Pohakuhanalei. Kahue said other people had alway[s] pointed out the upper hill or rock as Pohakuhanalei but that he corrected them, when the survey was made. He then proceeded to point out other points on the Kona and Kaohe boundaries of Humuula, until he began to point out places near the top of Mauna Kea. He then hesitated, and said he could not remember the names of the places on Mauna Kea; said that he was not well, that he had not slept any the previous night, and that he was anoe[?].

After a while he again pointed out Pohakuhanalei, this time it was the upper hill and he said he had made a mistake in pointing out the lower one.

Our party left Kalaieha in company with Ashford Spencer and others, and went down across the pahoehoe to a point on the pahoehoe that was shown us as Kawauwauwai and said to be on the boundary of Humuula and Waiakea. This point is a long distance mauka of Mawae and the forest. We then proceeded towards Laumaia to the edge of the forest to Kahiliku; thence to Puuoo, meeting with H.B. Montgomery and Kirchoff. Between Kahiliku and the base of Puuoo we passed a pond of water called Kaelewa. This pond is in a hollow above the woods. At Puuoo we could not get Kahue to point out any place. He said he was pupule, and Naaikauna said that at two different times, in former years, he had known him to be crazy.

The fog began to set in and so we returned to Laumaia, and there leaving Messrs McCully, Montgomery and others, we proceeded to camp on the edge of the woods by Kapunakala 2d. Kahue was raving all the afternoon, and far into the night.

[page 177] December 3d, 1873
Kahue was somewhat better than the night before. We left camp and proceeded to a pile of rocks near the gulch. Mr. McCully rejoined us here and Mess[rs] Hitchcock Bros. Remained at Kapuakala. We then proceeded along the road from Laumaia to Waimea, as far as Kaala, when we struck through the woods to shore. Could not get much information from Kahue, about the different points as he persisted that he was crazy. Naaikauna pointed out about the locality of points in the woods. There are no prominent points to be seen in the woods, from the hills on Hakalau until you near the boundaries of Maulua and Laupahoehoe, when we could see the hills Puukoa and Puukoe in and a short distance from the mauka edge of the forest.

As we neared the lower edge of the forest, Kahue, began to tell about the boundaries again and by the time we stopped at Amina's, a place near the boundary of Hilo and Hamakua, he was ready to tell all the boundaries between Humuula and the adjoining lands.

Reached Hilo, December 4th 1873.
Continued until further notice to interested parties.
R.A. Lyman, Commissioner of Boundaries, 3d Judicial Circuit

Costs: 6 days traveling on mountain 60.-; & 6 days hearing 60.-; 120.-
recording 123 folio 30.50, advertising hearing 4.-; 34.50
Paid to July 20 1874, 154.50


Humuula Ahupuaa, District of Hilo, Island of Hawaii, Boundary Commission, Volume D; pps 52-57

In Re Boundary between Humuula, District of Hilo and Kaohe and other lands, District of Hamakua, Island of Hawaii

Hilo, Hawaii, August 20, 1891, Court house, J.F. Brown, appears in behalf of the Hawaiian Government; C.P. Iaukea, Crown Land Agent, for Crown Lands, Amina Hanneberg, Lessee of Humuula, E.D. Baldwin, Government Surveyor, and others, present.

The application of J.F. Brown, in behalf of his Excellency, The Minister of Interior, for the Hawaiian Government, being on file, and notice having been given to interested parties, also filed a map, shewing location of the lands in question.

Hilo, August 14th, 1891
Honorable F.S. Lyman, Boundary Commissioner for 3rd Judicial Circuit, Hawaiian Islands
Sir:
On behalf of His Excellency, The Minister of Interior, I beg to apply for a settlement of the boundary line between the Crown land of Humuula and the adjoining government tract, extending from Pohaku Hanalei on Mauna Loa, to the head of Kaala in Hamakua, known principally as the Government land of Kaohe.

The boundary as claimed by the government is along yellow tinted portion of the accompanying map, from Pohaku hanalei to head of Kaala.

By settling an early date for the hearing of this case you will greatly oblige
Your Obedient servant
J.F. Brown

[page 53]
Evidence
Hoakimoa, kane, sworn, Name Hoakimoa, 54 years old, am kamaaina in mountain lands. I lived there with my father shooting cattle. In 1859 I left that place. I know boundary of Humuula and Kaohe. Commence at Puukea, on Mauna Kea, boundary of Koholalele and Kaohe, Puukea is one corner and Puu o Kihe the other, are the corners of Koholalele and Kaohe; and on to Iolehaehae, along Kukaiau and Kaohe, then to Keahunaiwi, many things there. Iwaiwa, Puuhinahina, &c. then to Kole. I know Kaupakuhale, on from Kole, and to Kalepe a Moa near Kalaieha. I was very well acquainted there. At Kalepe a Moa, look down to Omao o koili, that is as far as I know; along the line I have given, is Humuula below and Kaohe above. I know Kaula Gulch. Waikulukulu is the name below, and Kaula gulch above.

The bound up from the Government road to Puukalepa, is Humuula on one side and Kaala on other side of the line. From Iolehaehae to Puukalepa the Kaula gulch has always been the boundary between Kaala and Humuula.

I know places called Keonewakiu and Kamakahalau, on Kaohe, we used to lasso cattle there. Humuula does not go to the top of Mauna Kea, in olden times only three men ran after Uau on the mountain, along the side, was Kaohe above, Humuula below, and Piihonua at foot of mountain.
Cross-examined
Kaala is the ancient name of the land below. Kanakaleonui and Iolehaehae. The land above line from Iolehaehae to Puukalepa is Kaohe. The boundary of Humuula is the Kaula gulch.

Paakaula, kane, sworn, I was born in 1847, am kamaaina on Mauna Kea. My father, Nainoa, was kamaaina in mountain, and my knowledge came from him when I was young.

Commence at end of Kaohe on the mountain [page 54] "Puuokihe," a place called Keahunaiwi, between Puuokihe, and it is the boundary to Iolehaehae, and to Kanakaleonui, a long distance between - several lands and names between, that I do not know. Just below Kanakaleonui is Keahunaiwi, the point where Humuula and Kaohe join, a hill there. Keoniwakiu ahead of that, and Kahenahena and Kaiwaiwa are just above the hills, the boundary; then to Puuhuluhulu, above Ahuwela, the boundary is between Kaupakuhale and Puuhuluhulu hills; then to Puuloa, above it an old cattle pen called "Kulake," above Puuoo, then to Kole, there sighted by compass to Kalepe a Moa, then to Puuhuluhulu, that is as far as I know.

I do not know. on one side of gulch is Kaala, and Humuula the other side of Kaula gulch. So my father said. Know Kamakahalau, on Kaohe.
Cross-examined
The boundary is 1/4 or 1/2 mile perhaps, above Puuloa. Lahohinu is on Humuula, near Kaula gulch. Kaula gulch is the boundary between Humuula and Kaala. My father, Nainoa, told me so, he was formerly a witness before the Boundary Commissioner and he went with Curtis Lyons in surveying the boundaries of these and other lands.

It was said the Mamane belonged to Humuula, but some mamane is on Kaohe also. I did not go on Humuula with my father. He belonged to Hamakua. Kahue and Naaikauna are kamaainas of Humuula. I went with my father in surveying.

Amina, sworn, I think I am over 50 years old. Know the mountain. Puukea and Puuokihe, along Kaohe, and to Iolehaehae, Kaohe above and below Kukaitui has some and Kaala some, and to Ahuopopuaa below, and then to Puukalepa by Kaula gulch, then gulch runs to Keahunaiwi and Makahalau, above is Kaohe. [page 55] "Keahunaiwi" is near "Kanakaleonui," here Kaohe and Humuula join, and Kaala is below this point. Then on sand, "one o Akiu" to hill called "Kaiwaiwa," and to "Kahinahina" - the mauka side of those two hills is Kaohe, and makai is Humuula. Then to "Ahuwela," and "Puahuluhulu" hills, and on to Puuloa. The boundary is at "Kaupakuhale," above Puuloa. "Kaupakuhale" is on Kaohe. Then to "Kulake" cattle pen, to drive wild cattle; then to "Kole" hill, then to another hill "Huikau," then to "Puuhuluhulu," then to "Mokolii" that is as far as I know. I know Akaula gulch from the sea to the mountain. It runs up large below and small above. From the mountain road to "Puukalepa," the Kaula gulch is between Humuula and Kaala.
Cross-examined
The boundary from Iolehaehae to Poopuaa, a hill below, then to Puukalepa, at Kaula gulch. I know Lahohinu on Humuula, near the road, a small road, the Government road is above that. Lahohinu is near Kaula gulch; then up to Puukalepa. Poopuaa is on Kaala. I gave names of the lines of hills.

The testimony of Nakupuna, kane, taken before Judge E.W. Barnard, at Laupahoehoe, North Hilo, the witness being too old and feeble to come to town. August 14, 1891, produced by Government agent, and allowed by Crown Agent.

Nakupuna, kane, being duly sworn, said, Commencing at Puokihe, Koholele joins with Kaohi. Kukaiau makai Kaohi mauka.

Ahupuaa, Kaohi mauka Kukaiau makai. At Waikulukulu Kaala and Humuula join; Kanakaleonui is the next point. Humuula is makai and Kaohi is mauka. Wakiu sand is on Kaohi. Puhinahina next with Humuula makai and Kaohi mauka. Puuloa with Humuula makai and Kaohi mauka. Kalepeamoa with Humuula makai and Kaohi mauka. Puhuluhulu next point. Kaohi extends over to Kau and Kona. Kaala joins Humuula at Lahuhinu.

I am old and an old resident and went in the mountains with the kamaainas.
(Signed) "na ku pu na"
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 14th day of August 1891
The above witness is a very aged man, said to be 100 years of age.
E.W. Barnard, Notary Public, III Judicial Circuit.
(L.S.) [Legal Seal?]

witnesses of Crown Agent
A. Hanneberg, sworn, I am lessee of Humuula, residing at Humuula, mostly at Kalaeeha, about four years, know the boundaries of Humuula. Had a man in my employ, A.P. Deverill, who had been on the mountain over 22 years. He pointed out the boundaries to me.

Commencing on Mauna Loa, at a prominent stone called Pohaku hanalei, runs from there to "Omao koili" hill, then mauka to Kalepeamoa, then to prominent hill called "Kole," then following edge of vegetation to Kaupakuhale, from there to Kamakaleonui, thence to Iolehaehae; but from Iolehaehae he was not certain to give the boundary definitely - in his opinion, part of Kaala belonged in reality to Humuula and Humuula boundary adjoins Kaula gulch.
Cross-examined
Deverill told me after I went to Humuula; he was then in my employ.

He brought Kaala higher up, but I cannot remember the exact points, as I was not acquainted then, and lived at Kalaeeha.

Crown produces Book A of the Boundary Records, the testimony taken regarding Humuula, page 28, &c.
Crown Rests

J.F. Brown asks to continue the hearing to Honolulu, for further testimony, [page 57] which request is declined, for want of Jurisdiction out the IIId Circuit.

Continued by request of the Government agent and assented to by Crown Agent, until return mail from Honolulu, to file briefs of the testimony.
F.S. Lyman, Commissioner of Boundaries

Briefs filed, and case submitted

Decision
It is decided that the Boundary between the Crown Land, Humuula, District of Hilo, and Kaohe, and other lands of the Hawaiian Government, District of Hamakua, Island of Hawaii, is as follows:

Commencing at the South corner of Kaala, as surveyed, Land Commission Award 9971 at a point in the Kaula gulch near "Lahohinu," by the upper edge of the forest, and run up the main branch of the Kaula gulch called "Waikulukulu," between Humuula and Kaala, to a point near "Puu Kalepa," thence along the Waikulukulu gulch, between Humuula and Kaohe, to "Kanakaleonui," thence in direct lines along the boundary between Humuula and Kaohe, to "Kaupakuhale," thence to "Kole," thence to "Lepe a Moa," thence to the west side of "Omao koili" hills, thence to "Pohaku Hanalei," on the North slope of Mauna Loa. Surveys to be made and filed before certificates of Boundaries are issued.
F.S. Lyman, Commissioner of Boundaries, 3d Judicial District, Hawaiian Islands
Hilo, Hawaii, October 3, 1891

October 17, C.P. Iaukea, Agent for Crown lands, notes appeal to the Supreme Court
Costs 2 days employed on case $20.00
16 folio record at .25 c. 4.00
Return of appeal $24.00
1.00
Bond filed for Costs on appeal $25.00 Paid.

[No. 58, Humuula Ahupuaa, District of Hilo, Island of Hawaii, Boundary Commission, no survey; see also Ahupuaa of Makahanaloa for Humuula information]

Certification: 058
Ahupua`a: Humuula (Part 1)
District: Hilo
Island: Hawaii
Ownership: Crown
Misc:
Year: 1891
Statistics: 84336 characters 14438 words
Humuula Ahupuaa, District of Hilo, Island of Hawaii, Boundary Commission, Hawaii, Volume A; pps. 238-240

Honolulu, July 7, 1873
R.A. Lyman, Esquire, Hilo
Dear Sir
Mr. F.H. Harris is authorized by the commissioners of Crown lands to make application to you as commissioner of Boundaries to have the boundaries of all Crown lands on the Island of Hawaii defined. He has a list of the lands with him.

I have also authorized Mr. F.H. Harris to make application to you for the settlement of boundaries of all lands belonging to Estate of His late Majesty and Her Excellency, R. Keelikolani.

I expect to be in Kona by the trip of the "Kilauea" which leaves here on the 28th instant. Can't you make it convenient to come round as the steamer goes to Hilo on that trip.

I wish also to apply for the settlement of the boundaries of Honohina.
I remain, Yours respectfully
Jno. O. Dominis

Honorable R.A. Lyman, Boundary Commissioner for Island of Hawaii, Hawaiian Islands
The undersigned would herewith make application for the settlement of the boundaries of the following named Ahupuaa or lands belonging to the Crown, viz.;

Waiakea in the District of Hilo bounded by Keaau, Olaa, Kapapala, Humuula, Piihonua

Piihonua in the District of Hilo, bounded by Punahoa, Waiakea, Humuula and Pueo, Paukaa & Alae and other lands names not known

Ponahawai in the District of Hilo bounded by Punahoa, Kukuau & other small lands.
Hakalauike in the District of Hilo, adjoining lands unknown [page 239]
Humuula in the District of Hilo bounded by Kapapala, various lands in Kona and Kohala and Hamakua, and Hakalau, Makahanaloa, Papaikou, Paukaa, Piihonua and Waiaka in the District of Hilo

Lalakea in the District of Hamakua, adjoining lands unknown
Kalopa in the District of Hamakua, adjoining lands unknown
Honokaia in the District of Hamakua, adjoining lands unknown
Kaohia in the District of Hamakua, adjoining lands unknown
Waimanu in the District of Hamakua, adjoining lands unknown
Pohakumauluulu, Ili of Waipio in the District of Hamakua, adjoining lands unknown
Muliwai, Ili of Waipio in the District of Hamakua

Pololu in the District of Kohala adjoining lands unknown
Aamakao in the District of Kohala adjoining lands unknown
Iole in the District of Kohala adjoining lands unknown
Kaaukuku in the District of Kohala adjoining lands unknown
Waimea in the District of Kohala adjoining lands unknown
Puukapu in the District of Kohala adjoining lands unknown
Kawaihae in the District of Kohala adjoining lands unknown
Puuwaawaa In the District of Kona bounded by Puuanahulu, Government, Kaupulehu Estate Kamehameha V.

Haleohia in the District of Kona bounded by Government lands & Kaupulehu, Estate Kamehameha V.

Honomalino in the District of Kona bounded by Omokaa & Okoi, Government & by Kahuku, G.W. C. Jones & Co.
Puaa in the District of Kona adjoining lands unknown
Onouli in the District of Kona adjoining lands unknown [page 240]
Manoloa, District of Hilo
Hiaananaloli II in the District of Kona bounded by Hiaananaloli, Government & Hiaanaloli, R. Keliikolani.

Waiohinu in the District of Kau, bounded by Keau, Government, Kahilipalinui and Kahuku, G.W.C. Jones & Co.

Kapapala in the District of Kau bounded by Kahuku, G.W.C. Jones, Keauhou, Estate Kamehameha V, Waiakea, Hilo & other lands unknown

Olaa in the District of Puna, bounded by Keaau, Wm. C. Lunalilo, His Majesty, Waiakea & Kapapala

Apua in the District of Puna. Bounded by various lands in Puna
Waiakolea, ili of Kalapana, District of Puna adjoining lands unknown
Kaimu in the District of Puna adjoining lands unknown
Gehena [?Kehena] in the District of Puna adjoining lands unknown

Your Honor will therefore please appoint a day for the hearing the evidence in the foregoing named lands and having decided upon the same to grant a certificate to that effect to the undersigned
(Signed) Jno. O. Dominis, Crown Land Agent,
by F.H. Harris, attorney at law,

Hilo Hawaii, August 16th A.D. 1873


Humuula Ahupuaa, District of Hilo, Island of Hawaii, Boundary Commission, Hawaii, Volume B; pps 28-59

The Ahupuaa of Humuula, District of Hilo, Island of Hawaii, 3d Judicial Circuit

On this, the 3d day of November A.D. 1873 by adjournment from the 30th October, the Commission of Boundaries for the Island of Hawaii, 3d Judicial Circuit met at the Court House in Hilo, on the application of J.O. Dominis, Agent of Crown Lands for the settlement of the boundaries of Humuula, situated in the District of Hilo, Island of Hawaii.

Notice personally served on owners or Agents of adjoining lands, as far as known. Also served by publication in the Hawaiian Gazette of [left blank] and Kuokoa of [left blank].

Present, E.G. Hitchcock for applicant, for Mrs. L.K. Dominis, Her Excellency, R. Keelikolani, the Estate of Kamehameha V, C.R. Bishop and self, D. Kamai for Hawaiian Government Lands in Hilo, and D. Alapai.

For Petition see Folio 238, Book A.

Testimony

J.A. Simmons, kane, sworn, I have lived on Hawaii for forty two years and in Hilo, District about half of that time. I shot wild cattle on Humuula for eight years. This was soon after I came into the Country, but I have been there since. I used to live with Ned Gurney at Lahohino, a place above the woods on Humuula. He had lived there a great many years, and was kamaaina of the place. He and others pointed out to me the boundaries between Humuula and the lands of Maulua, Hakalau, Makahanaloa and Piihonua.

Makaulaula, kane and Opukeike, kane, old bird catchers of Piihonua, also pointed out the boundaries to me, when I lived at Pahukea, saw mills on Piihonua.

Humuula is bounded on the east side by Kahoahuna, the boundary is at the bottom of Kaoalii gulch, where water sometimes runs; thence up the gulch, through the woods. Kahoahuna only extends a short distance and I do not know the names of the lands above Kahoahuna (Mrs. Halelea's).
[page 29]
The boundary as pointed out to me above the woods runs towards Hilo. The mamani &c being on Humuula until you come to Maulua. I do not know what lands bound it before you come to the land of Maulua. The boundary between Humuula and Maulua (as pointed out to me) is at the edge of the woods makai of the mamani; the boundary of Maulua on the Hamakua side is at a gulch called Kaiaike; Thence along the edge of the woods crossing two or three awaawa to an awaawa at the junction of Maulua and Piha. I can go and point this place out, but I do not remember the name. Thence along the edge of the woods across the head of Piha to Naohe gulch, at the junction of Hakalau, with Humuula and Piha (This is what I have always been told); thence along the head of Hakalau to Palanolelo gulch, the boundary runs to a pile of stones, on the Hilo side of the gulch, and about two hundred yards above the edge of the woods; thence along the head of Makahanaloa to Nukupahu gulch, the boundary running on the makai side of the mamani; thence (I was gold) the boundary runs along the mauka edge of the woods along the land of Piihonua (There may be other lands between Makahanaloa and Piihona for I do not know how far Piihonua bounds Humuula, but I do know that the boundary of Humuula runs along the mauka edge of the woods[)]. I do not know as Waiakea bounds it. I have heard that the land reaches to Kapapala, but I do not know it to where [?overwritten word]. Have heard it reaches to Pohakuhanalei, a big stone near the top of Mauna Loa, on the slope toward Mauna Kea.

Humuula is cut off on the Kona side by Kaohe of Hamakua; heave never heard that it joins Kaalaala of Kau. Kaohe bounds it on Mauna Kea and I do not know the boundaries of Mauna Loa.

On Mauna Kea Humuula (was pointed out to me) as extending up the mountain as far as the mamani grows. I do not know the names of the points on this boundary but I could point them out if I went there. It comes over towards Hamakua to Iolehaehae; thence to Kaula gulch, where it enters the mauka edge of the forest. I do not know the boundaries through the [page 30] woods. The land of Kaala bounds Humuula just above the woods. The boundary at the Government road makai is at a small gulch on the Hamakua side of Kaualii gulch. I do not know the names of the gulch or lands that bounds it there.
Cross-examined
The boundary (as pointed out to me) after it runs through the woods, did not run makai into the woods again, but took the mamani above the woods. The lands makai run through the woods to mamani, there may be a tree or two of mamani in woods. A great deal of the forest has been killed out by the cattle barking the trees and destroying the underbrush. Therefore the woods do not extend so far mauka s they did twenty years ago.

Know the place called Puuoo, a big hill on the plains of Humuula is now called by that name, but the original Puuoo is a hill covered with ohia, and was told it was on the land of Waiakea. It is makai of the hill on Humuula, and I am certain it is not on that land. I now live at Laupahoehoe.

Nainoa, kane, sworn, I am a kamaaina of Hamakua, at the time of Aipala, now a part of the boundaries of Humuula, as they were pointed out to me by people who are now dead.

Li Kauwila (his father) and Pali, who were kamaainas of Humuula showed me the boundaries, and told me not to go to certain places.

The boundary at shore is at Kawalii gulch and is bounded by Kahoahuna, thence mauka along the gulch to Waipunalei, do not know where Kahoahuna ends. Thence along Waipunalei to Kihalei, puu mamake, a point in the woods on Kawalii gulch; thence along Maulua to a place called Kaiaike, a kauhale on Humuula, at the mauka edge of the woods. The mamani is on Humuula and the woods are on Maulua.

At Kihalei the boundary leaves the Kawalii gulch and runs to the Hilo side of it, along the land of Maulua, leaving [page 31] all the gulch on Humuula. From Kaiaike the boundary runs towards Hilo to Heenui, a place where we used to catch birds, and the junction of Piha with Maulua and Humuula; thence along Piha to (Naohe) Pohohona, an awaawa at the edge of the woods, makai of the kauhale of Naohe; Thence along the mauka edge of the woods to Kaloaloa, the junction of Hakalau with Humuula (The old people did not know what lands were between Piha and Hakalau.[)] Kaloaloa is a kauhale and a pond of water; thence along Hakalau, makai of the mamani, to Palanolelo, a kauhale, above the woods on Humuula, thence (I have head [heard]) Papaikou joins Humuula and Hakalau; thence crossing the head of Papaikou to the kahawai Kapuakala, which I have heard is a branch of the Wailuku gulch; thence the boundary runs to Waipahoehoe gulch, above the woods, the mamani being on Humuula; thence to Laumaia along Piihonua; thence to Aama; thence to Waikee gulch; thence to Puuoo, a hill above the woods, the boundary on the makai side; there are small trees on the hill and there is a pond of water called Kelewa this side of it. Above the woods, and towards Mauna Loa of Puuoo it belongs to Humuula. Humuula and Piihonua people used to go after water there. This is as far as I know the boundaries and as far as I went with the kamaaina; they told me that Humuula was bounded by Kapapala of Kau, Keauhou of Kona and Kaohe of Hamakua. I have never heard that Kaalaala of Kau or Waiakea of Hilo joined Humuula. The old trail from Humuula towards Piihonua used to run along the mauka edge of the woods near the boundary; not in the woods. The Humuula and Piihonua people used to go after water at Kelewa.

Humuula is bounded makai by the sea to Keahuonaai, bounded by the land of Kaohaoha on the Hamakua side, the boundary running in the center of Poololo gulch. I do not know the boundaries through to the outside of the woods, know it is bounded by Kaala at Lahohino. The boundary above the woods is at Kaula gulch, said gulch runs makai but there are several lands between it [page 32] and Humuula, makai of the woods.

Lahohino is on Humuula near Kala gulch; thence mauka to Ahapopuaa (an ahupuaa) along Kaala, at this point Kaohe joins Humuula and cuts Kaala off. This is as as [sic] far as I know the boundaries.
Cross-examined
Don't know what lands bound Humuula in woods on Hamakua side.
I went after birds on Humuula for seven years after Kaua o Kekuaokalani[?] and have often been there since. The line of the woods is in the same place now as in olden times. I have always heard that Maulua and other lands run through the woods to the makai side of the mamani. When I went after birds on Humuula, Li told me not to catch the birds in Koa and mamani, as they belonged to the makai lands, and would be taken away by the people of those lands if I caught them.

J. Parker, kane, sworn, I have lived on Hawaii nearly fifty years, used to live on the mountain, and shoot bullock for Kamehameha III, at the time that the natives were gathering sandalwood. I have often been on Humuula after bullock and have heard the natives talking about the boundaries; they said that where ever the mamani grew, above the woods was Humuula, and the land below the mamani belonged to the makai lands. I head this from men who were old and gray headed then. In those days the mamani did not reach near to the koa there used to be plains between and I always understood that the tall forests belonged to the makai lands and the pili and mamani to Humuula. Hemahema's father (now dead) and Paakai, who was killed in a pit on the mountain were two of the ones that told me the above. I have always heard that Humuula commences at shore and runs up mauka, through the woods, but I never heard that it runs back into the woods again. Have been up Maulua road and always understood that Maulua did not run through [illegible] the woods but I do not know whether Piiha on Humuula cut if off.
Cross-examined.

[page 33]
Kahue, kane, sworn, I was born at Humuula, am seventy-three years of age, and a kamaaina of the land and know its boundaries. Kalaimaka, Mohaiku, Eekamoku (all dead) were kamaaina of Humuula and pointed out the boundaries to me. Kahoahuna bounds Humuula on the east side, the boundary beginning at the sea shore in Kaualii gulch; thence mauka along the center of the gulch to Mauiana gulch at the mauka corner of Kahoahuna (said gulch is a branch of the Kaualii and enters it at this place); thence along the lands of Auliilii 2d and Auliilii 1st across to Waiapae gulch (another branch of the Kawalii) the boundary running towards Hilo.

Kahoahuna runs into the woods, but where the oo are is Humuula. From Waiapae, the boundary runs in the woods to Waipahoehoe gulch, where Waipunalei joins Humuula. Waiapae is a large pool of water in the gulch. Waipahoehoe gulch runs clear through the woods and Waipunalei bounds Humuula to Pihalelei about three miles below the mauka edge of the woods. Thence towards Hilo to the land of Laupahoehoe, at Puukole, a kuahu manu and kauhale, this place is away in the woods, as far makai as Pihahelei; it is on Laupahoehoe; thence to Puukoa, a hill covered with koa, on Kaiwilaihilaihi and Kapehu and at the junction of Kaiwilaihilaihi and Humuula; the boundary here runs mauka and I think this point is a mile or more below the mauka edge of the woods. Thence along Kapehu to Pupuulehu, a kauhale on Maulua, a mile or more from the edge of the woods; thence along Maulua towards Hilo, to Kawelu; said place is near Heenui, and there is a mamani grove a short distance off. This place Kawelu, is about a mile makai of the mauka edge of the forest (Kaiaiki is mauka of Puulehu); thence along the land of Piha. Kaluaalu mauka of the woods on Humuula and Kumukau are on Piha; directly makai, and about a mile below the edge of the forest; thence along the land of Piha to Kaumuhapu, this place is directly makai of Naohe.
[page 34]
This place is a kualapa, and is where the people of Naohe used to go after hapu. Thence Hakalau joins Humuula at Naohe gulch at the mauka end of Umauma gulch. Kaumuhapu is above this gulch. Thence along Hakalau to Kupuna, a water place directly makai of Hapuwai, outside of the woods; Kupuna is about a mile makai of the mauka edge of the woods; thence to Makewai, a place where there is no water.

Nawaiahu is a kauhale outside of the woods near Hakalau gulch. From Makewai the boundary runs through the woods to Kapahee, he mauwai koloa. Kaloaloa is a kualapa above the woods; Kapahee is about a mile below the edge of the woods; thence along Hakalalu to a large water place called Kapohopaele, makai of Palauolelo, which is above the woods; thence along Makahanaloaa to Waikaloa, a large pond of water on Papaikou, the point above this place is Kaaimana, a kauhale on Humuula. Waikaloa is about a mile makai of the mauka edge of the forest; thence to Kumukawau, a kauhale, on Papaikou, it is makai of Kapuakala; a kauhale on Humuula and near the boundary of Puakaa. Thence to Kalaopapainui a kauhale on kualapa on Paukaa land and where Piihonua joins Humuula. There is no gulch here. The Kapuakala is on the Hamakua side of this place and the point of koa and ohia woods running out onto the plains just mauka of this place is Lai. (I went there a short time since with you, E.G. Hitchock, and Hitchcock and we placed a marked rock at this point called Lai).

Thence makai along the land of Piihonua to Paakainui, a kauhale on Piihonua. above in the woods, and makai of Waipahoehoe, a cave in Wailuku gulch of woods (it is a mile makai of the edge of the forest); thence to Kumunaio, makai of Lumaia, the cave called Kanuha is at Laumaia, the boundary runs parallel with the mauka edge of the woods. Kumunaio is where the road runs out of the gulch that runs from the mauka edge of the forest; thence to Ohiakanio, this place is directly makai of the kahawai, and cave of Aama; thence to Nahuina, the junction of the branches of the Wailuku. The boundary runs makai to this gulch. I think this place is a mile or more from the mauka edge of the forest - about the same [page 35] distance as the other places I have mentioned. Puuoo is a hill mauka of Nahuina above the woods; thence to Elekalua, a kauhale in the woods, makai of Kahiliku, a lae laau outside of the woods; thence to Mawai, a crack in the woods that runs from makai. I have heard that Waiakea joins Humuula here, but I do not know which side of the lava flow of 1854 or 1855 the lands join. Thence the boundary of Humuula runs to Kawauwauwai, a kauhale; the boundary running to this point in scattering bush, the forest ends at Elekalua. I have never seen the boundaries beyond Kawauwauwai. From thence (I have heard) it runs to Puuoo, a hill covered with trees; mauka of Hoaa; thence to Keanaokauakii, a cave above the woods; thence to Puumanu, a hill on the aa way above the woods (I have been there); thence to Pohakuloa, an ahu of stones, now called Keahu o Kuakini, as Kuakini built a new ahu there. Kapapala is said to cut Humuula off to Pohakuhanalei. Boundary runs near Puuonioni, on Humuula, the boundary is a little beyond Wekahuna, a hill on Humuula. Waiakea ends at Pohakuloa, and from there Humuula is bounded by Kapapala to Pohakuhanalei (I do not know whether Kapapala extends to Pohakuhanalei); From Pohakuhanalei to Koaohe it is bounded by Kaalaala of Kau. I have been to Koaohe after sandalwood. It is a point on the road running over Mauna Loa. Pohakuhanalei is a large rock high up on the side of Mauna Loa toward Kalaieha.

Koaohe is on Mauna Loa, a koa; there Kaohe joins to Puualala, a cave. Thence to Puualalula, a red hill on the side of Mauna Loa near its base. Thence along the land of Kaohe to Omaokoili, two hills, the boundary running between them. Thence to Kauwaiwa, a hill on Humuula, near boundary, near the base of Mauna Kea; Thence to kahawai Koikapue, a gulch where mele were sung; thence up the mountain to Waiau (half of the water in the gulch belonging to Kuohe and half to Humuula; thence to Puuokukahauula, the highest peak of Mauna Kea, said hill in on Humuula and the boundary runs to the foot of said hill on the side toward Waimea; thence to a large ahu called Makanaka, said ahu is [page 36] on Humuula and is higher than a man; the boundary runs very near it. Thence to Kamakahalau, a hill on Humuula, from the top of which you can see Waiakea; thence to Puukaliali, a hill on Humuula, the boundary at the base; thence makai to Iolehaehae, a hill on Humuula, boundary at the base. Thence down to Ahuapoopuaa, a ku ahu and hill on Humuula, the boundary at the base; thence down to Kaiwiholiholi, an ahua pohaku there; thence to Ahuamoa, along the land of Kaohe. Kaala was surveyed by Lyons and cuts into Humuula, and takes in Iolehaehae, Ahupup ....

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.... I was with Henry Lyman most of the time while he was surveying the land of Hakalau; was with him when he surveyed the upper part of it. I think it was in 1853 or 1854. I do not remember names of kamaaina. He had kamaaina at that time. If I remember right old Waiki was the kamaaina on part of Humuula. I accompanied my brother as he was teaching me surveying. Neither line was cut through the woods. My brother had already surveyed Makahanaloa bounding Humuula on one side. He cut through the woods on that survey. The lands Makahanaloa and Hakalau abound each other most of the way; through the woods; do not join at lower edge. This is the Puna side. The Hamakua side was along the Kamaee gulch. Do not know as it was measured all the way. It was measured below the woods. I was not with him all the time. The line on the Puna side of Hakalau was measured from shore to woods and the [page 58] distance from this line to a prominent hill in woods on Makahanaloa was measured by triangulation. The kamaaina said there was a certain point in the woods where Hakalau joined Makahanaloa, that he had got on a previous survey of Makahanaloa. Being no natural boundary on that side he made a straight line to that point from the lower edge of the woods. From the other side adjoining Humuula we went to the upper side of the woods. Kapou was the man who had charge of Hakalau at that time. He went with us and took other men who he said were kamaaina, as he was not well acquainted himself. Kapou tells me these kamaaina were Kupouli and Manu. Waiki went with us from Humuula. We went through the woods. James Castle, and two men to carry the chain, went along with my brother and myself. We went to a pile of stones on a little hillock above the woods. I should say it was on the pili grass about a quarter of a mile from the thick forest, among scattering trees, mamani, koa and some ohia. I was told that pile of stones was at the western corner of Makahanaloa, mauka end, as it had been surveyed by my brother. The kamaaina said that was where Hakalau joined Makahanaloa and Humuula. There was o dispute about it among the kamaaina at that time. We measured from that pile of stones, along the land of Humuula, towards Hamakua as the kamaaina pointed out, keeping just about as far from the thick forest as when we started from Makahanaloa, until we came to a gulch, which the kamaaina said was the Kamaee gulch. I do not remember the name they gave it; they said it was the gulch that went clear to the sea and that it was the boundary below between Kamaee and Hakalau. I have with me notes made by brother. It is not a very wide gulch, but it is quite deep. If I remember right, we built a pile of stones on the Puna side of it. The line, where we measured, was given as the mauka boundary of Hakalau, and nothing was said about the boundary being elsewhere. The kamaaina took us [page 59] to the corner of Makahanaloa and said that was the point where the lands joined.

My brother took Castle along as he wished to be certain that he found the same pile of stones as he built when surveying Makahanaloa.

At that time Castle was shooting on the mountain, a great deal of the time, and said he had seen the pile of stones and could point it out.

Notes read. Hakalau uka commenced at Puakala, four courses straightened into one.
North 3° West 117.10 chains to stream. Waiahiu.

I can swear that is the original notes of survey as made by my brother.

The survey was made for Halalea.

Papaikou was surveyed by Henry and David surveyed Paukaa. Papaikou corners with Makahanaloa; the survey of Paukaa overlaps Papaikou and Makahanaloa.
Cross-examined.

Case continued until further notice to all interested parties.
R.A. Lyman, Commissioner of Boundaries, 3d Judicial Circuit

Continued on Folio 174


Humuula Ahupuaa, District of Hilo, Island of Hawaii, Boundary Commission, Volume B; pps 174-177

The Ahupuaa of Humuula, District of Hilo, Island of Hawaii, 3d Judicial Circuit

Continued from Folio 59

Notes from the journal of the Honorable Commissioner of Boundaries taken while visiting the upper boundaries of Humuula.

November 28th, 1873
Left J. Parkers. Mana, Hamakua, Island of Hawaii in company with L. McCully, H.B. Montgomery, and E.R. Folson, and proceeded to Kalopa, Hamauka. There met D.H. Hitchcock and E.G. Hitchcock. Found that Peleiholani had gone to Hilo and that James castle was too sick to come.

November 29th 1873
Left Kalopa and proceeded to Kaala. There went through the forest onto the foot of the mountain and went along the road to Laumaia, the road runs a short distance above the woods. Above the woods, we passed a good many of the points mentioned by Kahue, Naaikauna, Waiki and others in their testimony and camped after dark at a place called Hapuwai.

Naaikauna and Kahue joined the party at Kaala. L. McCully and H.B. Montgomery left us at the upper edge of the woods. Heard of James Castle's death when half way through the woods.

November 30th 1873
Started at day light and went along the upper edge of the forest passing Nawaiheu gulch to Hahaloa, there left the trail to Laumaia and went into the woods for some distance on the kualapa; boundary between Hakalau and Makahanaloa to opposite Puuwai, a hill on Hakalau; there we left the boundary and went onto Makahanaloa, crossing the Aama gulch, and camped on Makahanaloa some distance makai of Puuwai.

Kahue says Puuwai is a long distance [page 175] makai of the point he claims as the boundary between Humuula, Hakalau and Makahanaloa.

December 1st, 1873
Left camp and walked up to where we struck the ridge that runs into wood from makai of Kaloloa. We were onto the ridge a good way mauka of Puuwai. Left D.W. Hitchcock at camp.

After a good deal of persuasion on Kahue, he pointed out a hollow on the top of the ridge as Pohopaele. At this point the kualapa is quite high and slopes off rapidly toward the shore. It is impossible for this point to be seen from Kaloloa as it is be lower than the edge of the woods. It took us twenty minutes to walk from this point to what is now the upper ridge of the forest. The boundary between Humuula and Makahanaloa, as pointed out by Kahue, is a hollow commencing on the ridge between these two lands; this ridge is the one on which the road from the beach through Makahanaloa lies; thence the hollow runs down the kualapa the same as the ridge and on the west side of Aama gulch.

Puuwai is on the next ridge to ea westward [diagram of Y lying on its side with word ridge along foot and no (illegible word) in it]. The upper portion of the forest is full of dry trees, laying all over the ground. We then proceeded to Palanohelo gulch. Kahue pointed out to us where the woods used to run; it was close to Laumaia road. We then went to Kapuakalawaiole. Kapuakalawai is near Lai, said to be the Nukupahu gulch. Then went to a point of woods called Lai, a long sharp point of woods extending to some distance above the woods. Then went on across Waipahoehoe and Laumaia gulches and the Aama branch of the Wailuku. From thence we went to Mr. Kirchoff's house, where L. McCully rejoined the party. We then proceeded to Kalaieha. Kahue states that the Nahuina of Wailuku is not where the Laumaia and Waipahoehoe branches unite, but that it is about the same distance makai of the mauka edge of the woods ass Pohopaele, that the gulches Aama, Waikee and Kalapaohelo unite at Keanalepo, and that Keanalepo is not the makai junction of Laumaia. He states that [page 176] Keanalepo is a place that he dug.

Arrived at Kalaieha a little before dark.

December 2d, 1873, Kalaieha
On asking Kahue to point out Pohakuhanalei he pointed out a hill a good ways down the slope of Mauna Loa below what we had always understood to be Pohakuhanalei. Kahue said other people had alway[s] pointed out the upper hill or rock as Pohakuhanalei but that he corrected them, when the survey was made. He then proceeded to point out other points on the Kona and Kaohe boundaries of Humuula, until he began to point out places near the top of Mauna Kea. He then hesitated, and said he could not remember the names of the places on Mauna Kea; said that he was not well, that he had not slept any the previous night, and that he was anoe[?].

After a while he again pointed out Pohakuhanalei, this time it was the upper hill and he said he had made a mistake in pointing out the lower one.

Our party left Kalaieha in company with Ashford Spencer and others, and went down across the pahoehoe to a point on the pahoehoe that was shown us as Kawauwauwai and said to be on the boundary of Humuula and Waiakea. This point is a long distance mauka of Mawae and the forest. We then proceeded towards Laumaia to the edge of the forest to Kahiliku; thence to Puuoo, meeting with H.B. Montgomery and Kirchoff. Between Kahiliku and the base of Puuoo we passed a pond of water called Kaelewa. This pond is in a hollow above the woods. At Puuoo we could not get Kahue to point out any place. He said he was pupule, and Naaikauna said that at two different times, in former years, he had known him to be crazy.

The fog began to set in and so we returned to Laumaia, and there leaving Messrs McCully, Montgomery and others, we proceeded to camp on the edge of the woods by Kapunakala 2d. Kahue was raving all the afternoon, and far into the night.

[page 177] December 3d, 1873
Kahue was somewhat better than the night before. We left camp and proceeded to a pile of rocks near the gulch. Mr. McCully rejoined us here and Mess[rs] Hitchcock Bros. Remained at Kapuakala. We then proceeded along the road from Laumaia to Waimea, as far as Kaala, when we struck through the woods to shore. Could not get much information from Kahue, about the different points as he persisted that he was crazy. Naaikauna pointed out about the locality of points in the woods. There are no prominent points to be seen in the woods, from the hills on Hakalau until you near the boundaries of Maulua and Laupahoehoe, when we could see the hills Puukoa and Puukoe in and a short distance from the mauka edge of the forest.

As we neared the lower edge of the forest, Kahue, began to tell about the boundaries again and by the time we stopped at Amina's, a place near the boundary of Hilo and Hamakua, he was ready to tell all the boundaries between Humuula and the adjoining lands.

Reached Hilo, December 4th 1873.
Continued until further notice to interested parties.
R.A. Lyman, Commissioner of Boundaries, 3d Judicial Circuit

Costs: 6 days traveling on mountain 60.-; & 6 days hearing 60.-; 120.-
recording 123 folio 30.50, advertising hearing 4.-; 34.50
Paid to July 20 1874, 154.50


Humuula Ahupuaa, District of Hilo, Island of Hawaii, Boundary Commission, Volume D; pps 52-57

In Re Boundary between Humuula, District of Hilo and Kaohe and other lands, District of Hamakua, Island of Hawaii

Hilo, Hawaii, August 20, 1891, Court house, J.F. Brown, appears in behalf of the Hawaiian Government; C.P. Iaukea, Crown Land Agent, for Crown Lands, Amina Hanneberg, Lessee of Humuula, E.D. Baldwin, Government Surveyor, and others, present.

The application of J.F. Brown, in behalf of his Excellency, The Minister of Interior, for the Hawaiian Government, being on file, and notice having been given to interested parties, also filed a map, shewing location of the lands in question.

Hilo, August 14th, 1891
Honorable F.S. Lyman, Boundary Commissioner for 3rd Judicial Circuit, Hawaiian Islands
Sir:
On behalf of His Excellency, The Minister of Interior, I beg to apply for a settlement of the boundary line between the Crown land of Humuula and the adjoining government tract, extending from Pohaku Hanalei on Mauna Loa, to the head of Kaala in Hamakua, known principally as the Government land of Kaohe.

The boundary as claimed by the government is along yellow tinted portion of the accompanying map, from Pohaku hanalei to head of Kaala.

By settling an early date for the hearing of this case you will greatly oblige
Your Obedient servant
J.F. Brown

[page 53]
Evidence
Hoakimoa, kane, sworn, Name Hoakimoa, 54 years old, am kamaaina in mountain lands. I lived there with my father shooting cattle. In 1859 I left that place. I know boundary of Humuula and Kaohe. Commence at Puukea, on Mauna Kea, boundary of Koholalele and Kaohe, Puukea is one corner and Puu o Kihe the other, are the corners of Koholalele and Kaohe; and on to Iolehaehae, along Kukaiau and Kaohe, then to Keahunaiwi, many things there. Iwaiwa, Puuhinahina, &c. then to Kole. I know Kaupakuhale, on from Kole, and to Kalepe a Moa near Kalaieha. I was very well acquainted there. At Kalepe a Moa, look down to Omao o koili, that is as far as I know; along the line I have given, is Humuula below and Kaohe above. I know Kaula Gulch. Waikulukulu is the name below, and Kaula gulch above.

The bound up from the Government road to Puukalepa, is Humuula on one side and Kaala on other side of the line. From Iolehaehae to Puukalepa the Kaula gulch has always been the boundary between Kaala and Humuula.

I know places called Keonewakiu and Kamakahalau, on Kaohe, we used to lasso cattle there. Humuula does not go to the top of Mauna Kea, in olden times only three men ran after Uau on the mountain, along the side, was Kaohe above, Humuula below, and Piihonua at foot of mountain.
Cross-examined
Kaala is the ancient name of the land below. Kanakaleonui and Iolehaehae. The land above line from Iolehaehae to Puukalepa is Kaohe. The boundary of Humuula is the Kaula gulch.

Paakaula, kane, sworn, I was born in 1847, am kamaaina on Mauna Kea. My father, Nainoa, was kamaaina in mountain, and my knowledge came from him when I was young.

Commence at end of Kaohe on the mountain [page 54] "Puuokihe," a place called Keahunaiwi, between Puuokihe, and it is the boundary to Iolehaehae, and to Kanakaleonui, a long distance between - several lands and names between, that I do not know. Just below Kanakaleonui is Keahunaiwi, the point where Humuula and Kaohe join, a hill there. Keoniwakiu ahead of that, and Kahenahena and Kaiwaiwa are just above the hills, the boundary; then to Puuhuluhulu, above Ahuwela, the boundary is between Kaupakuhale and Puuhuluhulu hills; then to Puuloa, above it an old cattle pen called "Kulake," above Puuoo, then to Kole, there sighted by compass to Kalepe a Moa, then to Puuhuluhulu, that is as far as I know.

I do not know. on one side of gulch is Kaala, and Humuula the other side of Kaula gulch. So my father said. Know Kamakahalau, on Kaohe.
Cross-examined
The boundary is 1/4 or 1/2 mile perhaps, above Puuloa. Lahohinu is on Humuula, near Kaula gulch. Kaula gulch is the boundary between Humuula and Kaala. My father, Nainoa, told me so, he was formerly a witness before the Boundary Commissioner and he went with Curtis Lyons in surveying the boundaries of these and other lands.

It was said the Mamane belonged to Humuula, but some mamane is on Kaohe also. I did not go on Humuula with my father. He belonged to Hamakua. Kahue and Naaikauna are kamaainas of Humuula. I went with my father in surveying.

Amina, sworn, I think I am over 50 years old. Know the mountain. Puukea and Puuokihe, along Kaohe, and to Iolehaehae, Kaohe above and below Kukaitui has some and Kaala some, and to Ahuopopuaa below, and then to Puukalepa by Kaula gulch, then gulch runs to Keahunaiwi and Makahalau, above is Kaohe. [page 55] "Keahunaiwi" is near "Kanakaleonui," here Kaohe and Humuula join, and Kaala is below this point. Then on sand, "one o Akiu" to hill called "Kaiwaiwa," and to "Kahinahina" - the mauka side of those two hills is Kaohe, and makai is Humuula. Then to "Ahuwela," and "Puahuluhulu" hills, and on to Puuloa. The boundary is at "Kaupakuhale," above Puuloa. "Kaupakuhale" is on Kaohe. Then to "Kulake" cattle pen, to drive wild cattle; then to "Kole" hill, then to another hill "Huikau," then to "Puuhuluhulu," then to "Mokolii" that is as far as I know. I know Akaula gulch from the sea to the mountain. It runs up large below and small above. From the mountain road to "Puukalepa," the Kaula gulch is between Humuula and Kaala.
Cross-examined
The boundary from Iolehaehae to Poopuaa, a hill below, then to Puukalepa, at Kaula gulch. I know Lahohinu on Humuula, near the road, a small road, the Government road is above that. Lahohinu is near Kaula gulch; then up to Puukalepa. Poopuaa is on Kaala. I gave names of the lines of hills.

The testimony of Nakupuna, kane, taken before Judge E.W. Barnard, at Laupahoehoe, North Hilo, the witness being too old and feeble to come to town. August 14, 1891, produced by Government agent, and allowed by Crown Agent.

Nakupuna, kane, being duly sworn, said, Commencing at Puokihe, Koholele joins with Kaohi. Kukaiau makai Kaohi mauka.

Ahupuaa, Kaohi mauka Kukaiau makai. At Waikulukulu Kaala and Humuula join; Kanakaleonui is the next point. Humuula is makai and Kaohi is mauka. Wakiu sand is on Kaohi. Puhinahina next with Humuula makai and Kaohi mauka. Puuloa with Humuula makai and Kaohi mauka. Kalepeamoa with Humuula makai and Kaohi mauka. Puhuluhulu next point. Kaohi extends over to Kau and Kona. Kaala joins Humuula at Lahuhinu.

I am old and an old resident and went in the mountains with the kamaainas.
(Signed) "na ku pu na"
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 14th day of August 1891
The above witness is a very aged man, said to be 100 years of age.
E.W. Barnard, Notary Public, III Judicial Circuit.
(L.S.) [Legal Seal?]

witnesses of Crown Agent
A. Hanneberg, sworn, I am lessee of Humuula, residing at Humuula, mostly at Kalaeeha, about four years, know the boundaries of Humuula. Had a man in my employ, A.P. Deverill, who had been on the mountain over 22 years. He pointed out the boundaries to me.

Commencing on Mauna Loa, at a prominent stone called Pohaku hanalei, runs from there to "Omao koili" hill, then mauka to Kalepeamoa, then to prominent hill called "Kole," then following edge of vegetation to Kaupakuhale, from there to Kamakaleonui, thence to Iolehaehae; but from Iolehaehae he was not certain to give the boundary definitely - in his opinion, part of Kaala belonged in reality to Humuula and Humuula boundary adjoins Kaula gulch.
Cross-examined
Deverill told me after I went to Humuula; he was then in my employ.

He brought Kaala higher up, but I cannot remember the exact points, as I was not acquainted then, and lived at Kalaeeha.

Crown produces Book A of the Boundary Records, the testimony taken regarding Humuula, page 28, &c.
Crown Rests

J.F. Brown asks to continue the hearing to Honolulu, for further testimony, [page 57] which request is declined, for want of Jurisdiction out the IIId Circuit.

Continued by request of the Government agent and assented to by Crown Agent, until return mail from Honolulu, to file briefs of the testimony.
F.S. Lyman, Commissioner of Boundaries

Briefs filed, and case submitted

Decision
It is decided that the Boundary between the Crown Land, Humuula, District of Hilo, and Kaohe, and other lands of the Hawaiian Government, District of Hamakua, Island of Hawaii, is as follows:

Commencing at the South corner of Kaala, as surveyed, Land Commission Award 9971 at a point in the Kaula gulch near "Lahohinu," by the upper edge of the forest, and run up the main branch of the Kaula gulch called "Waikulukulu," between Humuula and Kaala, to a point near "Puu Kalepa," thence along the Waikulukulu gulch, between Humuula and Kaohe, to "Kanakaleonui," thence in direct lines along the boundary between Humuula and Kaohe, to "Kaupakuhale," thence to "Kole," thence to "Lepe a Moa," thence to the west side of "Omao koili" hills, thence to "Pohaku Hanalei," on the North slope of Mauna Loa. Surveys to be made and filed before certificates of Boundaries are issued.
F.S. Lyman, Commissioner of Boundaries, 3d Judicial District, Hawaiian Islands
Hilo, Hawaii, October 3, 1891

October 17, C.P. Iaukea, Agent for Crown lands, notes appeal to the Supreme Court
Costs 2 days employed on case $20.00
16 folio record at .25 c. 4.00
Return of appeal $24.00
1.00
Bond filed for Costs on appeal $25.00 Paid.

[No. 58, Humuula Ahupuaa, District of Hilo, Island of Hawaii, Boundary Commission, no survey; see also Ahupuaa of Makahanaloa for Humuula information]